A grammar of colouring- PDF book by George Field

A grammar of colouring applied to decorative painting and the arts


A grammar of colouring



I have therefore introduced new diagrams of the primary, secondary, and tertiary colours, with their numerical equivalents, which will, I trust, render the subject more clear than it has hitherto been. I have next developed the hints on the modes of operation, and have given ample and practical instructions as to the methods of mixing colours, and the manipulation generally adopted in Sepia, Water-colour, Tempera, Oil, and Fresco Painting, with information as to the materials and implements, used a section which will, I hope, be found practically useful to the student.

The works of Mr George Field have been so long known to the public, and their excellence is so generally admitted, that they have become text-books, the authority of which has been universally quoted; and it was with a certain amount of diffidence that I undertook the revision of the " Grammar of Colouring." My earliest and soundest lessons on colour were obtained from this book, and I have therefore touched it with an affectionate hand, guided by that feeling of veneration with which a grateful student approaches the work of an excellent master. 

More than twenty years of practical teaching have shown me where the province of the book might be extended, in order that it might more directly touch the class of students who so much need its aid, and I have therefore amplified the work of the author so as to adapt it to the requirements of the government examinations re-writing for this purpose such portions as seemed to want additional clearness in order to be well understood by those who have not previously had the benefit of scientific education, and whose technical instruction has unfortunately been too long neglected in this country. 

I have therefore introduced new diagrams of the primary, secondary, and tertiary colours, with their numerical equivalents, which will, I trust, render the subject more clear than it has hitherto been. I have next developed the hints on the modes of operation, and have given ample and practical instructions as to the methods of mixing colours, and the manipulation generally adopted in Sepia, Water-colour, Tempera, Oil, and Fresco Painting, with information as to the materials and implements, used a section which will, I hope, be found practically useful to the student.


 A decorative artist, however, who merely paints a border or a scroll because there happens to be a vacant space, without any reference to the appropriateness of his design, or only because he is ordered to do so, becomes a mere living machine, and I have therefore given a sketch of the history of Ornamental Art, showing the growth of the various styles, and giving illustrations of the leading characteristic features of each, in order that the student may be awakened to the necessity of adapting his decoration to the character of the building to be ornamented, and that he may be- led to further study of the subject. The adaptation of the instruction given in this book to the house-painter, grainer, marbler, and sign-writer, is given in a special volume, and I thus cordially dedicate my work to those who are seeking instruction, in the earnest hope that they may be benefited thereby.


Some Contents:

CHAPTER I.

Colour, as an element of beauty, not utility, how produced, 1

CHAPTER II.
The Three Orders of Colours: Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary How the Secondary colours are compounded from the Primary, and the Tertiary from the Secondary. ,

CHAPTER III.
The contrasts and accordances of colours The complementary colours The scale of equivalents

CHAPTER IV.
Illustrations of colouring Suggestions for studies The harmony of Blue with Orange, Red with Green, Yellow with Purple The harmony of succession and contrast; of colour with neutrality The blue background to sculptures among the Greeks Application of principles necessary in addition to literary knowledge Colour no less a science than musical sounds ...tic


CHAPTER V.

Material Colours: Colours distinguished as inherent and transient i
CHAPTER VI.

Qualities of Pigments: 1, the beauty of colour, including purity, brightness, and depth; 2, body ; 3, transparency, or opacity; 4, working well; 5, keeping their place; 6, drying well; 7, durability In mixing colours, the artist should avoid using a greater number of pigments than necessary The improvements in the modern manufacture of colours . . 14

CHAPTER VII.
Of White and its Pigments: The term colours as distinguished from pigments "White and its qualities White lead London and Nottingham whites Flake white Blanc d'argent Roman white Sulphate of zinc Zinc white Tin white Pearl white Constant white White chalk Chinese white 16




the book details :
  • Author: George Field
  • Publication date: 1888
  • Company:London: Crosby Lockwood

  • Download  28.5 MB

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