Kant and his philosophical revolution - PDF by R. M. Wenley

Kant and his philosophical revolution 

Kant and his philosophical revolution

From the introduction
:

Kant remains ' caviare to the general.' It is hard to reproduce the subtleties of his thought so that the average man may sense their ways, harder still to create a vital appreciation of the importance and Scope of his speculations. Probably, a profound ' revolution ' was never loosed upon the world in such forbidding mien. 

For, as Kant says himself, "while the greatest care was bestowed upon the matter, little care was expended on the style, or in rendering it easy for the general reader." Further, my task has been made at once more and less difficult by the admirable commentaries upon the Kantian philosophy and its results accessible to English readers now.

 More difficult, because many matters have been explained with skill and insight that I cannot pretend to rival. Less difficult, because the path has been blazed so clearly. 

Partly for these reasons, and partly in the spirit of this Series, it has seemed best to consider at length the 'epochal' relations of the philosopher's problems and conclusions; to exhibit somewhat fully the personal, human interest of his career; and to follow closely his slow mental development, which mirrors the age so well. Yet, even thus, the immense difficulty of the simple statement does not disappear; although Kant left no system in the strict acceptance, his technicalities possess rights that never lapse. I can but say that I have simplified to the best of my ability, and add, that Kant students alone are in a position to realise the obstacles to fluent exposition. 

As far as may be, I have subordinated moot problems in Kant's philology,' and avoided ramifications that could not be followed up within a space limited by pre-arrangement. Scholars who have undertaken a small book on a great subject know full well the troubles that afflict the just at any time, and, with Kant for the theme, difficulties beset one from every quarter. 

In particular, the proportions to be assigned to each part have raised sore puzzles, like the necessary omissions. I cannot hope that I have succeeded altogether in these respects. The book is designed to do the general reader a service i and, of course, his demands concern the larger sweep of Kant's thought rather than the minute details of the Critical Philosophy. 

The writings of E. Caird, Stirling, Watson, Morris, Adamson, Wallace, Sidgwick, Paulsen, and Prichard should be in the hands of all English readers who desire to pursue the ramifications of the Critical Philosophy seriously.

Contents:

PART I— ORIGINS
CHAPTER I
The Labgee Environment:— The ORiaiNS and Condition of Kant's Germany .... 3
CHAPTER II
The Larger Environment—— The Intellectual Perspective — Eclecticism — Cross-currents op
Rationalism, Empiricism, and Sentimentalism . 23
CHAPTER III
The Nearer Environment: — Parentage — Home and School — Pietism . . . . .53
CHAPTER IV
The Nearer Environment (continued): — Academic
Influences — Society and Urban Life — The Inner Man. . . . . . . .68

PART II— DEVELOPMENT
CHAPTER I
The Period of Scientific Eclecticism . . .99
CHAPTER II
The Period of Hesitation . . . .130
CHAPTER III
The End of an Epoch . . . . .149
PART III— THE PHILOSOPHICAL REVOLUTION
CHAPTER I
The Theoretical Coxsequbncbs op the Critical
Philosophy . . . . . .173
CHAPTER II
The Critical Philosophy and the Function op the
Moral Life ...... 209
CHAPTER III
The Teleological Aspect op Experience and
Religion . . . . . .231
CHAPTER IV
Forward prom Kant . . . . 256
Index 297


The book details :
  • Author: Robert Mark Wenley
  • Publication date: 1910
  • Company: Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark

  • Download 7.6 MB
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