The psychology of everyday life - by James Drever - PDF ebook

The psychology of everyday life

The psychology of everyday life


The Psychology of Everyday Life might rightly be considered as covering the major portion of the field of modern psychology. This fact the author has kept in view throughout. 
The time has now come when the ordinary educated man desires some closer acquaintance with this science, which has so long represented a rather mysterious region, into which he has hardly ever dared to seek to penetrate an attitude encouraged by the apparent aloofness of the older psychology from the pursuits and interests of daily life. The aloofness has in recent times disappeared. 

The work of the modern psychologist touches daily life at many points. What one might designate the ' psychologist's creed ' is no longer professed merely by the psychologist the belief, that is, that for all those arts and sciences which are concerned with the human factor in the world process in any of its phases the science of psychology is as fundamental as is the science of physics for all those arts and sciences which are concerned with physical processes.

 The feeling of mystery to is fast yielding to a genuine desire for more knowledge. This little book has been written with the object of satisfying this very reasonable desire. It is not an elementary textbook of psychology; nor is it a popular account of some of the marvels of psychology with all the psychology left out. 

It is popular, indeed, in the sense of being intended for the general reader, but from first to last it is a serious attempt to present, as far as possible in non-technical language, the main facts of the science so far as this touch the life of the man in the street. dulties are not slurred over or avoided, but faced, where the purpose of the work demanded that they should be faced. 

Technical and philosophical discussions alone are avoided, and the latter has really no place in psychology as a science in any case. To some extent, the author has set before himself as a model Lewes's " Physiology of Common Life." How far he has fallen short of the qualities of that really excellent book, he is himself clearly conscious; his aim, nevertheless, has been to do for the psychology of the present what Lewes did for the physiology of his time. 

The topics which have been selected for treatment represent at one and the same time the essential elements of the science and those sections of it more particularly which have a close relation to practical life, and which in recent times have come prominently into notice in connexion with various developments in medicine, education, and industry. 

Some contents:



I INTRODUCTION ....... 1
Definition of Psychology Use of Psychology Methods and Sources of Data Relation to Philosophy and to Spiritism.
II THE FRAMEWORK OF EXPERIENCE . . .11
The Biological Point of View Knowing, Feeling, and Striving Conservation Cohesion Selection.

III APPETITES AND INSTINCTS 
 Forces of Human Nature or Instinctive Tendencies Classification Appetites and Reactive Tendencies Acquired Appetites Specific Tendencies and General Tendencies Simple and Emotional Tendencies Development and Modification of Instinctive Tendencies.

IV EMOTION, MOOD, AND SENTIMENT . . .31
Nature of Emotion Organic Resonance Work of Pavlov, Cannon, and Others Psychical Effects- Moods Sentiments Acquired Interests Function of Sentiments and Interests Conflicts The Self Sentiment.

V SOCIAL INTERACTION. ..... 46
The Social Tendencies Imitation Function of Imitation Sympathy Suggestion and Suggestibility Conditions Favourable to Suggestion.
VI PLAY, RELAXATION, AND MIRTH . . . 57
Differences Between Play and Work Function of Play in Life of Adult and Child Relation Between Play and Art .-Esthetic Feeling and Emotion Mirth and Laughter Theories of Laughter Laughter as Expression of Joy Emotions.
VII DEFENCE MECHANISMS ..... 67
Sorrow Emotions Types of Defence Mechanism Worry.
III PERCEIVING ....... 75
Characteristics of Perceptual Experience Complexity of Percept Objective and Subjective Factors Influence of Feeling Learning Perceive Experimental Investigation of Perceiving.
3X SOUNDS AND COLOURS ..... 87

Tones and Noises Limits of Tone Series Gangs Consonance and Dissonance Visual Experience Colour Mixing Colour Contrast Colour Blindness Colour Preference Colour Combinations.
the book details :
  • Author: James Drever
  • Publication date: 1921
  • Company: London, Methuen & co

  • Download 7 MB
     

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