The pleasant career of a spendthrift - PDF by George Meudell

The pleasant career of a spendthrift 

The pleasant career of a spendthrift



My travels in forty countries covering over 400,000 miles by land and sea, on over 400 steamships, and through about 600 hotels, allow me to claim I have travelled further than most Australians. Of course, postmen, commercial travellers, sea captains and railway guards have an opportunity of breaking my record for distance. 

During my travels, I have met lots of people who have been everywhere, have seen little, and remembered less. I have not been able to find a better country than my own Australia. 

The old controversy as to which is the finest harbour city in the world can only be truthfully settled in favour of Sydney, with Rio Janeiro half a length away second, and Naples a bad third. Among the " also-rans " are Hobart, Auckland, Queenstown, Quebec, Nagaski, San Francisco, and Hong Kong, precisely in that order. Before going abroad to view the world I saw my native land fairly extensively and knew something of the South Sea Islands and of glorious New Zealand. There is no such picturesque country elsewhere as New Zealand, although we have in Australia magnificent scenery of a quality unknown to the Europeans.

 In fact, the traveller does not need to go outside Australasia for sightseeing, or to see the best, get the best or do the best this planet affords.

 All these years of travel over the Seven Seas have fixed firmly in my soul and mind the belief that my native land, Australia, is the best country and the Australians are the best people on the globe. The finest people of all the nations are the French, and unlike most other peoples the French as a nation love their homeland, passionately and devotedly. 

The English, the Scotch, the Londoners (who are a curious sect of the British people standing apart), Germans, Italians, Swiss and all those other races from the cold north of Europe have no obsessing love of country. The Irish have mostly left Ireland, but they were forced out. For freedom, for food, for work, for money, they leave their homes as soon as they can. And most of those countries are good places to get away from. The Australian is pure-bred, of one race, and that (excepting the French) the best race of them all the miscalled Anglo-Saxon. 

The latest figures are not available, but those of the 1921 census give the birthplaces of the inhabitants of Australia as 86 per cent born in Australasia, 10 per cent born in the United Kingdom, and only 4 per cent born in foreign countries. 

Ours is, perhaps, the purest breed of people living. The strain was a good one too, because only the strong and healthy men and women were able to travel from Europe hither, and speaking generally, the Government immigrants in later years were examined and selected. So the Australian is well and cleanly bred from good stock, and endowed with excellent bone and blood. 

Given these requisites of pure blood and strong bone, it is only necessary to use plenty of wholesome food in a fine climate to produce, physically and mentally, healthy men and women. The Australian is a superior being physical. Other nations do not produce such a high proportion of able-bodied men and women as the Australian nation, because Australians are essentially livers out of doors.

Contents:

I. EARLY EXPERIENCES . . .1
II. LAND BOOM AND LAND BOOMERS. I1
III. POLITICS, LEAGUES, ASSOCIATIONS, CLUBS.
THE KYABRAM MOVEMENT . . 34
IV. BANKS AND BANKERS . . .54
V. MINES AND MINING. STOCK EXCHANGE QUEST . . . .8l
VI. FORTUNES MISSED . . .130
VII. TRAVELS A TABLOID OF TRAVEL. 145
VIII. PEOPLE I HAVE KNOCKED ABOUT WITH. 190
IX. AUSTRALIAN PEOPLE . . . 227
X. EARLY EXPERIENCES. HOTELS, CAFES,
DINNERS, ENTERTAINMENTS . . 273

the book details :
  • Author: George Meudell
  • Publication date: 1926
  • Company: London: George Routledge

  • Download 24 MB

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