A history of Arabic literature - PDF book by Clément Huart

A history of Arabic literature

A history of Arabic literature by Clément Huart


This volume has been written at my invitation for this series of Short Histories of the Literatures of the World and has been translated from the author's manuscript by Lady Mary Loyd. Professor Clement Huart, who is one of the most distinguished and most widely accomplished -of living Orientalists, was born in 1854. 

He is among the many eminent Eastern scholars who have proceeded from the Ecole des Langues Orientales Vivantes, and it is his rare distinction to have proceeded, from the first, at equal steps along with the investigation of Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Romaic literature. He was early attached to the service of the French Foreign Office and exercised for several years the functions of chancellor at the French Consulate at Damascus. 

He was ultimately called to Constantinople, originally as dragoman to the French Embassy, then as Consul. In 1890 he was sent to Asia Minor to make a report on the Arabic epigraphy of that province, and he has made similar investigations in Syria. He was recalled to Paris to fill the responsible office of secretary-interpreter for Oriental languages to the French Government. The publications of Professor Huart are numerous and are known to all Eastern scholars. I have to thank Professor Huart for the kindness with which he has adapted his extraordinary stores of information to the scope of the volumes of the present series.

 As the system of literation used for the Arabic language in France is quite different from that employed by English scholars, it was necessary to transpose Professor Huart's spelling of proper names, and this task has been performed for me by Mr Reynold A. Nicholson, late Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, and now Lecturer in Persian to that University.

The most ancient remnants of this primitive Arab poetry are fragments of poems relating to the Hijd — satire — to which a superstitious feeling was attached, and a magic power ascribed. The poet — properly speaking, the sage, SM'ir, a sort of soothsayer — was called on to compose these satires, which passed from lip to lip amongst tribes of a common origin, and were swiftly answered by other satires, sprung from the brain of the poet of the tribal adversaries. 

Nothing now remains of the songs improvised — ac- cording to a former Prefect of Constantinople, St. Nilus, who turned hermit about a.d. 400 — by the Sinai Arabs, when they reached a spring after a long journey. Sozomen, a Greek author, who wrote an ecclesiastical history in the fifth century, reports that in A.D. 372 Mania or Mavia, Queen of the Saracens, defeated the Roman troops in Palestine and Phoenicia and that the memory of this victory was preserved by the Arabs in their popular songs. Human remembrance, unless set down on brick, or stone, or paper, is a very short-lived thing, and the memory of bygone days soon fades away. We must not wonder, then, that the most ancient of the Arab poems only go back to the sixth century of our era, when Nabatean travellers brought the Estrangelo alphabet from Syria and applied it to the Arab tongue — an attempt of this kind may be noted in the bilingual inscription of Harran.

Contents:



I. THE CLIMATE AND THE RACE — ORIGINS OF ARABIC POETRY— ITS PRIMITIVE FORMS . . I
II. PRE-ISLAMIC POETRY 10
III. THE KORAN 33
IV. THE OMEYYAD DYNASTY 46
V. THE 'ABBASIDS . . 63
VI. THE 'ABBASIDS {continued) 137
VII. THE 'ABBASIDS {continued) 174
VIII. THE 'ABBASIDS {continued) 216
IX. THE 'ABBASIDS {continued) 280
X. ARABIC LITERATURE FROM THE CAPTURE OF
BAGDAD DOWN TO THE END OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 323
XL THE NINETEENTH CENTURY . . . . . 411
XII. THE PERIODICAL PRESS 437
BIBLIOGRAPHY 447
INDEX 451


the book details :
  • Author: Clément Huart - who was a French orientalist, publisher and translator of Persian, Turkish and Arabic writings.
  • Publication date:1903
  • Company: New York, Appleton

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