Something to say and how to say it - PDF by Kleiser Grenville

Something to say and how to say it

Something to say and how to say it



The daily practice of reading aloud from the work of a standard author is one of the best preparations for public speaking. This exercise stimulates and develops all the mental powers. It confers the advantages which come from fitting words to the lips and gives an excellent opportunity for practical improvement in articulation, pronunciation, and vocal expression.

 A well-furnished mind presupposes a discriminating choice of books and a judicious way of reading them. The purpose of reading may be for study or for entertainment, but properly it is for acquiring knowledge and culture. useful material for public speaking than to nourish the mind with thoughts from the world's great writers. A public speaker should be a wide reader, a close observer, and a deep thinker.


One of the most essential things for you as a public speaker is to have something worthwhile to say. If you have a vital message to deliver or have thoroughly familiarized yourself with a subject of importance to your fellow men, you will have little difficulty in commanding an attentive hearing. Make it your deliberate purpose to acquire a large fund of useful knowledge, and as far as you are able to acquaint yourself with the best that has been thought and known in the world. The formation of "the student habit " is essential to your greatest progress in this valuable study.

One of the most essential things for you as a public speaker is to have something worthwhile to say. If you have a vital message to deliver or have thoroughly familiarized yourself with a subject of importance to your fellow men, you will have little difficulty in commanding an attentive hearing. Make it your deliberate purpose to acquire a large fund of useful knowledge, and as far as you are able acquaint yourself with the best that has been thought and known in the world. The formation of "the student habit " is essential to your greatest progress in this valuable study.

 Assuming that you are now interested in a particular subject upon which you wish to speak in public, your first aim should be to gather all the useful material available on that subject. As you proceed, other desirable themes will suggest themselves to your mind. Keep a separate notebook for each subject upon which you intend to gather material for future speech-making. Carefully write down in such books your newly acquired ideas, facts, information, and other data. 

These note-books will ultimately be of great value to you, since they will be the product of your own efforts. The more thoroughly you do this preliminary work of note-taking, the more authoritative and influential will you ultimately become as a public speaker. 

Make it an invariable rule to write down at once any new ideas or information which you think will be of value to you. Keep your notebooks at hand for ready use. Many thoughts will come to your mind which you can turn to good account if you seize them promptly, but which otherwise may disappear never to recur to you. I ask you now to consider the principal sources from which you may draw material for a speech. These are 1. Observation. 2. Conversation. 3. Beading. 4. Meditation.

Date: 1920

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