Ad Code

Pocket theology by Voltaire (1914) PDF ebook

Pocket theology by Voltaire

Pocket theology by Voltaire
Pocket theology by Voltaire


The editor took the theology parts from Voltaire's Philosophical dictionary and Put them in this book. Dictionary of Theology by Voltaire who is famous for Sense of Humor and wit.
Excerpt

AARON.

The high priest of the Hebrews, the worthy brother of Moses, and the perfect pattern of our modern priests. He caused his followers to worship, and he himself worshiped, the golden calf, an example that has been pretty closely imitated by the majority of his sacerdotal successors, even down to the present day. For his want of faith, he was for- bidden to see the Promised Land, which, probably, accounts for the slight faith of his successors in the promises of future bliss they so liberally hold out to believers. However, in spite of these drawbacks, God knew so well the value of a high priest that he showed himself deeply interested even with regard to the number of bells that he was to wear on his petticoats. This should teach us that nothing concerning his ministers is indifferent to God.

 
ABBEYS.
Sacred retreats from the corruptions of the world, built and endowed at divers periods of quickened faith by pious brigands, and destined to receive a certain number of very useful citizens and citizen- esses, who consecrated themselves to singing, eat- ing, and sleeping, all to the end that their fellow-citizens should succeed in their labors.


ABBOT.
A spiritual father, in the enjoyment of a tempo- ral income — attached to an abbey — on condition that he shall read his breviary, torment the monks, and go to law with them Every abbot in this world is not in the enjoyment of an abbey, though he would very much like to be so. A goodly number are only in the enjoyment of the right of going about dressed in black, wearing a linen band round their necks, and retailing items of the news of what is going on in the world. A spiritual father, in the enjoyment of a tempo- ral income — attached to an abbey — on condition that he shall read his breviary, torment the monks, and go to law with them Every abbot in this world is not in the enjoyment of an abbey, though he would very much like to be so. A goodly number are only in the enjoyment of the right of going about dressed in black, wearing a linen band round their necks, and retailing items of the news of what is going on in the world.

ABNEGATION.
A Christian virtue; the effect of divine grace. It consists in hating one's self; detesting every species of pleasure; avoiding everything that is pleasant and agreeable as if it were the plague it- self, all of which becomes quite easy if the subject has received a dose of grace sufficient to deprive him of his wits. A Christian virtue; the effect of divine grace. It consists in hating one's self; detesting every species of pleasure; avoiding everything that is pleasant and agreeable as if it were the plague itself, all of which becomes quite easy if the subject has received a dose of grace sufficient to deprive him of his wits.

 ABRAHAM. 
 The father of all the faithful. He lied and was made a cuckold; he pared off his foreskin, and, in a word, gave proof of so much faith that, had it not been for angelic intervention in the nick of time, he would have cut the throat of his own son, whom the Lord, in a jesting mood, had commanded him to sacrifice. God then made a covenant with him and with his seed forever; but the Son of God after- wards annulled this treaty for some good reasons that his papa did not foresee when he made it. e more fit and proper does it appear to the eyes of divine reason, or, in other words, of religion.
 
Download PDF ebook 

Post a Comment

0 Comments