The foundations of psychology (1921) by Jared Sparks Moore

The foundations of psychology 

The foundations of psycholog



The present volume is designed to serve a twofold purpose:

(1) as a textbook in advanced courses in general psychology, and 

(2) for general reading on the subject of the nature and methods of mental science. 

The work contains matter not usually found in the ordinary brief textbooks and manuals of psychology, and yet it is the endeavor of the author to present his material in such a form that it may be grasped by any interested reader who is familiar with those facts of the science which may be found recorded in any good textbook. The only work in English which in any degree covers the ground that I myself have traversed is the book by Boris Sidis on The Foundations of Normal and Abnormal Psychology. But though reference is frequently made in the following pages to this valuable work, a comparison of the tables of contents of Dr. Sidis's book and my own will be sufficient to indicate our differences in plan and aim. 

Another writer frequently cited in the ensuing pages is Hugo Munsterberg, and I wish to record here my deep sense of indebtedness to him for his illuminating work on the great problems of philosophy and of natural and mental science. This indebtedness is manifested many times in the ensuing work, notwithstanding my differences with him on many points. I think it may truthfully be said that in his death America has lost its one great theoretical psychologist — and in so writing, I say nothing of his invaluable work as a pioneer in the fields of practical and applied psychology. All quotations are in the exact words of the original writers, though I have not hesitated to change the marks of punctuation when such change has seemed to be in the interests of clearness. 

Words in square brackets [ ] have been added by the author of this book Sections are numbered consecutively throughout the book, regardless of chapters, and numbers in the parenthesis in the text refer always to those numbered sections. Chapters also are numbered consecutively, regardless of the larger "Books." Most of the chapters are broken up into ''Divisions," the numbering of which starts anew in each successive chapter.

 I wish to acknowledge with gratitude the assistance of my wife in the preparation of the manuscript, and of my father-in-law, Mr. D. W. Linch, in the drawing of some of the cuts; and also the interest of my colleagues, Professor M. M. Curtis and Professor H. A. Aikins.

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