The Knights of England (1906) by William Arthur Shaw in Two Volumes

The Knights of England. A complete record from the earliest time to the present day of the knights of all the orders of chivalry in England, Scotland, and Ireland, and of knights bachelors, incorporating a complete list of knights bachelors dubbed in Ireland 

The Knights of England


Download Volume 1 - 27 MB


Download Volume 2 - 29 Mb

Edited by George Dames Burtchaell

Excerpt:

In the compilation of this book, the following sources have been used : (1) For the ORDER OF THE GARTER the earlier portions of the list are based upon Beltz, Ashmole, Anstis, and Nicolas, primarily of course upon Beltz. But as Beltz includes King Edward III. among the original knight's founders, and as I exclude him from their number (on the principle that the Sovereign stands outside the fraternity of knights proper), there is a difference between my enumeration and that of Beltz. I have also adopted a different method of expressing the succession. Where these authorities cease, I have relied entirely on the original records of the Order, viz., the Register of the Garter; Young's MS. Register, and the other collections, volumes, and loose papers of Garter King of Arms. For the very freest access to these records and kindest assistance throughout I am indebted to the courtesy of Sir Alfred Scott Scott- Gatty, Garter King of Arms, and of the Very Reverend Philip P. Eliot, D.D., Dean of Windsor. 

(2) The lists of the ORDER OF THE THISTLE are based entirely on the original records of the Order. These records consist of two volumes of registers and a mass of papers. The registers were carefully kept, and the entries fully recorded in them until the year 1830. From that date, no further entry was made in them, and it is quite clear that these volumes dropped out of sight until they were re-discovered in the present year. The loose papers consisted of the usual official papers relating to knighthoods, ceremonial, and the statutes of the Order. To facilitate reference to all this material Sir Duncan A. D. Campbell, Bart., Usher of the Green Rod, and Secretary of the Order of the Thistle, most considerately had it all removed from the Heralds' College to the Record Office, and there we have together gone through the whole, sorted, classified and arranged it chronologically, and prepared the whole mass of it for the binder. As so arranged the knighthood papers extend to ten volumes, the official and ceremonial papers to two more volumes, and the statutes fill a final volume. The whole thirteen volumes are now being bound at Sir Duncan's private expense. In giving me access to the papers and his most ungrudging co-operation throughout Sir Duncan has laid me under the greatest obligation. 


(3) The lists of the ORDER OF ST. PATRICK were taken directly in the first place from those published by G. E. Cockayne, Esq., Clarenceux in the Genealogist in 1888, with MS. additions from that date down to 1902, most kindly furnished to me by Clarenceux himself. This list was then submitted to Sir Arthur E. Vicars, K.C.V.O., Ulster King of Arms, and by him most carefully collated with the original records of the Order, and amended, annotated, and amplified. The kindness of Sir Arthur Yicars in this is enhanced by the fact that he had himself intended to print and prepare for the press just such a list. It is impossible to express sufficient appreciation of such courtesy. (4) For the records of the ORDER OF THE BATH, the most diverse and varied sources have been used. For the very earlier periods, the ultimate records are the Close Rolls and Wardrobe Accounts, preserved

 in the Public Record Office. Early in the eighteenth century, Anstis surveyed this untravelled ocean of material with a zeal that would put to the blush any modern scholar. The results he published in the appendix to his " Essay upon the Knighthood of the Bath " 1725). This appendix has been the fountainhead from which all later writers have drawn their information as to the early Knights of the Bath, and in the main in the present volume, I have followed it and the appendix in Vol. III. of Nicolas. Here and there, however, I have gone behind Anstis to the original rolls and wardrobe accounts, with results that convince me that there is a rich harvest awaiting the man who will dare to do over again the work which Anstis did nearly two centuries since. In addition, I have printed from Ashmole the list of Knights of the Bath, made in 34 Edw. I., a list which Anstis, consciously, and Nicolas, unconsciously, omitted to print.

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