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Cicero's Tusculan disputations: also treatises on the nature of the gods; and on the commonwealth by Charles Duke Young

Cicero's Tusculan disputations: also treatises on the nature of the gods; and on the commonwealth by Charles Duke Young (1894)

Cicero's Tusculan disputations


This  book contains a collection of Cicero  Orations

The greater portion of the Republic was previously translated by Francis Barham, Esq., and published in 1841. Although ably performed, it was not sufficiently close for the purpose of the " Classical Library," and was therefore placed in the hands of the present editor for revision, as well as for collation with recent texts. This has occasioned material alterations and additions. The treatise "On the Nature of the Gods" is a revision of that usually ascribed to the celebrated Benjamin Franklin.

In the year a.u.c. 708, and the sixty-second year of Cicero's age, his daughter, Tullia, died in childbed; and her loss afflicted Cicero to such a degree that he abandoned all public business, and, leaving the city, retired to Asterra, which was a country house that he had near Antium; where, after a while, he devoted himself to philosophical studies, and, besides other works, he published his Treatise De Finibus, and also this treatise called the Tusculan Disputations, of which Middleton gives this concise description: " The first book teaches us how to contemn the terrors of death, and to look upon it as a blessing rather than an evil: "The second, to support pain and affliction with a manly fortitude; " The third, to appease all our complaints and uneasinesses under the accidents of life; "The fourth, to moderate all our other passions; "And the fifth explains the sufficiency of virtue to make men happy."

Publication date:1894

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